The Water Horse Poster

The Water Horse Poster

A cute looking and smiling mythical animal who is obviously still a baby. In a bathtub. The perfect image to grab the attention of the little kids and to make every adult run as far as possible.

The marketing for The Water Horse seems to be aiming really young. And not in the “fun for the whole family” way. It’s more of a “hey children, why don’t you force your parents to see this?” way. Sure, they manage to squeeze in that the people producing this also produced The Chronicles of Narnia. But unlike what happened with Narnia they don’t seem to be showing any elements that could appeal to the no longer so young among us. Perhaps because the movie itself lacks such elements?

(Via ComingSoon)

Right At Your Door Poster

Right At Your Door Poster

We meet again, Mr. hazard suit man.

Some of you might remember seeing this poster for 28 Weeks Later earlier this year.

28 Weeks Later Poster

I liked the 28 weeks Later poster. The one for Right At Your Door not so much. Although the latter does manage to convey that basic premise of the movie (a dirty bomb goes off in Los Angeles) it lacks the style of the former. The new poster is too slick, too clean, and because of that I think it doesn’t get across the sense of mayhem and danger as well.

From what I have read about Right At Your Door a good deal of the film takes place inside the house of the protagonist, where he seals himself. There he has to face the fear, the lack of information and the isolation. This is one of the elements that distinguishes this movie from the run of the mill disaster pic, and it would have been interesting if the poster had tried to show some of that. Or to show something else that made the film look more unique.

As it is now I think this is a decent, but very uninspired poster.

(Via IMPAwards)

The Heartbreak Kid Poster

The Heartbreak Kid Poster

Uhmm, this is an interesting variation. There are many comedy posters like this, with the title treatment in the bottom against a white background and some image occupying most of the rest of the poster. But in this case instead of the image being some inane depiction of the main characters together, like what we have in the poster for Along Come Polly, it is an image from smack in the middle of what is sure to be one of many physical jokes from the actual movie.

Along Came Polly Poster

I like it. It makes the poster more funny, and gives everybody a good idea of the kind of comedy this is going to be. And it still manages to do the obligatory reminding of people that Ben Stiller is in it.

A decent effort.

(From CinemaBlend, found via MovieMarketingMadness)

In the Valley of Elah Poster

In the Valley of Elah Poster

This poster for In the Valley of Elah is well made but mostly very typical. The characters, standing against a suggestive background. But there are a couple of things that I found interesting.

The first is the absence of Susan Sarandon, which is a little curious because the other two top billed actors appear in the poster. This could be because her character isn’t as important as the two depicted, or maybe it just didn’t fit right in the image. It’s also possible that they didn’t think she wouldn’t do much to sell the movie and preferred to focus on the other two instead of cluttering the poster more. I wonder which one was the real reason.

The second thing I found interesting was the use of the American flag in the background.

The flag is often used in action films, as an easy way to get people excited or riled up. It’s a powerful symbol which commands an emotional reaction.

But I’m guessing that is not why they used the flag here, although I’m not sure what the real reason was. It could be as simple as a remembrance that the movie involves characters which are part of the army. Or it could be an indication that the movie deals with the theme of patriotism and what it means or that it tries to make some statement about America today. Haven’t seen the film, so I don’t know if any of these would fit.

In the Valley of Elah will be screened during the Toronto Film Festival and it will be released for the rest of us September 21.

(Via ComingSoon)

Reservation Road Poster

Reservation Road Poster
(click for a large version)

This type of poster design, which uses several strips, each generally containing one of the film’s actors, is quite common. For example, this recent poster for Feast of Love uses it too.

Feast of Love Poster

Of course, within the constraints of this type of design there is still space for a lot of differentiation. Feast of Love is a light and romantic movie, so you get bright colors and a bunch of people smiling. Reservation Road is a much heavier drama, involving traffic accidents, deaths and a lot of soul searching. So you get darker colors and serious expressions.

There is a reason for the popularity of this type of design. It often makes for good looking and fairly effective posters, and it can be a good way to showcase all the actors in movies that are ensemble pieces. But it’s also a very safe approach that is unlikely to result in a truly great and memorable poster.

Trade Poster

Trade Poster

Trade is a movie about human sex trafficking. Now, if I had never mentioned that, I’m pretty sure you could have guessed that just by looking at the poster and noting the juxtaposition of the title, the bar code and the girl’s back.

I really think this is a powerful poster. Not only because it manages to transmit so neatly what the movie is about, but also because I think it elicits an immediate emotional response. Sure, it’s going to turn some people away, but the movie’s somewhat dark subject matter was going to do that anyway. On the other hand it will demand the attention of the people who aren’t turned away.

Not a poster I would like to have hanging on my wall tough.

(Via IMPAwards)

Final 3:10 to Yuma Poster

Final 3:10 to Yuma Poster (Big)
(click for a larger version)

Well, here is the final poster for 3:10 to Yuma.

As some of you might recall I really loved the first teaser poster, and didn’t much like the second. The final one is kind of in the middle for me. It showcases Russel Crowe and Christian Bale well, and manges to convey that this movie involves a struggle between these two (Batman vs. Gladiator!), something that the earlier posters didn’t really even try to do. And it maintains some of that old time feel with the black and white and the way the poster is divided. But on the other hand, it’s has nowhere near the elegance and style of the first poster, and it’s much closer to what would be a typical poster for this kind of film.

I have to say I’m a little bit surprised with the poster campaign for this movie. Instead of going with the slick and polished look they really seem to have tried to embrace the period aspect of the film, incorporating that in the design of the posters. In my opinion the results were a little mixed, but I have to commend them for trying to do something different.